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How Pip is Empowering Women to Understand Their Hormones Better

We connected the Hannah Dixon, founder of Pip, through Instagram and we couldn’t be more excited about the brand she is building. After struggling with the contraceptive pill for years, being diagnosed with PCOS, suffering from hair loss and spending years on a hormonal health roller-coaster, she decided to launch Pip to empower women to understand their hormones better.

“I don’t think many brands support women with the psychological impact of the daily and lifestage hormonal changes we go through and I hope pip can be part of the solution by providing women with knowledge and support,” explained Dixon.

While she prepares to launch an app which will provide daily insights into your cycle, she is already sharing educational content to help empower women to understand their hormones better, whether it’s their menstrual cycle, pregnancy or the menopause.

Read our interview with Hannah to learn more about her inspiration for Pip and the steps she’s taking to launch her brand. We also chatted about how she is learning to practice wellness and balance as she navigates some really big life changes, like pregnancy during a pandemic, moving countries, building a brand and being a new mom.

What was the inspiration for your company?

I struggled with the contraceptive pill for many years, and ended up stopping taking it completely in my mid-20s. I was then diagnosed with PCOS and it was a big shadow over my life for a few years. Just after that I spent a year or so suffering from hair loss. And throughout this hormonal health and hair roller-coaster, I couldn’t find information I trusted or understood and I wasn’t taken seriously by doctors. Once my hair was healthier and I felt happier, I finally opened up to my friends, and I was amazed to hear similar stories connected to hormones which we’d all been silently struggling through. I don’t think many brands support women with the psychological impact of the daily and lifestage hormonal changes we go through and I hope pip can be part of the solution by providing women with knowledge and support.

What is your background & how has it helped you build your company?

After 10 years in Marketing, building some well-loved sustainable beauty brands, I’m now sharing education and content ((and soon an app) to help empower women to understand their hormones better – starting with people who have menstrual cycles.

What is unique about your products?

We’re still pre-launch but have been working on several digital and physical products for some time. We’re starting with an app to help anyone with a menstrual cycle understand their hormones better. It will be a new, holistic (and positive) approach which aims to empower women to know and own their cycle by providing daily insights for their mind, body, beauty and self-care. We’re also focused on providing clean beauty products, free from hormone disruptors, which can help with common hormonal symptoms such as acne.

Once you had the idea, what were the first few steps you took to launch it?

I started researching more and realized that there is a two-fold problem – current content around hormones is overwhelming and the products on the market are not solving for women’s hormonal pain points nor connecting emotionally. Since then I’ve explored lots of avenues trying to find the best way to support women. At the moment, I’m focused on testing a demo of the app with users and we’re hoping to seek investment to make it a reality. If the app sounds like something you’d be interested in – you can join the waitlist here and follow us on Instagram.

What drives you?

I want to solve what I call the ‘hormone gap’ and empower women to happier lives every day by becoming the go-to brand for all of women’s daily hormone needs – whether it’s linked to their menstrual cycle, pregnancy or the menopause.

What is the most valuable lesson you've learned so far as an entrepreneur?

The pandemic, pregnancy and moving countries have put a pause on pip’s progress. I’ve learnt to slow down and take the pressure off myself while also continuing to persevere where I can. I think everyone can have great ideas, but only a few will see the idea through to fruition – I hope my determination will see pip come to life soon!

What does wellness mean to you?

Wellness means different things to me at different levels of my life. At the broadest level, it is about feeling that I’m living a happy and fulfilling life and that I’m able to spend time with my family and friends. A huge part of this is perspective and reminding myself of how lucky I am, and being grateful for the health and happiness of family and friends around me.

Wellness during my pregnancy has meant trying to tune into my body and listen to what it needs. It’s been a particularly stressful and anxious time as we’ve all lived through multiple lockdowns and the hormonal and bodily changes were especially hard at various points of my pregnancy. When I was nauseous, I didn’t think twice about napping, needing to take breaks in the work day or not exercising. I still tried to find ways to workout but for at least a month I didn’t have the energy (or stomach) to even walk around the local park. But as I entered the second trimester, it became about giving myself permission to continue to rest when I needed to and not feel guilty about trying to do everything. It’s also been about feeling what works for my body during exercise and I’ve discovered new workouts and I’m learning to appreciate what my body is doing even if I’m no longer doing the more intense HIIT workouts I did pre-pregnancy.

It has been about giving myself the space to enjoy being pregnant, to reduce my workload, and to recognise how a side hustle, pregnancy and relocating countries is a lot – and I can’t do it all. It’s not to say I won’t get there eventually, but for now I’m prioritizing where I spend my time – and often my body needs a nap rather than another email or two. Wellness right now is about trusting my body, listening to what it needs and slowing down so I can enjoy being pregnant and prepare for motherhood.

What are the best & hardest parts of being a mom and a founder?

The best change has been a renewed passion to build something which my little one will be proud of me for – it’s given me an added drive to make a difference. The hardest part is the sleep deprivation (my baby is 6 weeks old) and trying to juggle your day and squeeze an hour or so to work on getting pip off the ground and building it into the brand I want it to be. I’ve had to adjust my expectations on what I can achieve at the moment!

How do you "balance" motherhood and entrepreneurship?

I’m new to motherhood, as my little one is only 6 weeks old. Being pregnant and now a mother during a pandemic means uncertainty on a whole new level as does trying to create a business at this time! I think the balance comes from accepting you can’t do everything and not trying to be a perfect parent or a perfect entrepreneur but just giving yourself credit for doing the best you can, day in and day out.

 

 

 

Thanks for chatting with us Hannah! We can’t wait to follow Pip’s journey.

Hannah Dixon

Founder

Pip

After 10 years in Marketing, building some well-loved sustainable beauty brands, I’m now sharing education and content (and soon products) to help empower women to understand their hormones better – be it connected to their menstrual cycle, pregnancy or the menopause. I want to solve what I call the ‘hormone gap’ and empower women to happier lives every day by becoming the go-to brand for all of women’s daily hormone needs – whether it’s linked to their menstrual cycle, pregnancy or the menopause.